Rheumatology Activities

Research Activities

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Division: 
Rheumatology
Director: 
Lisa Imundo, MD
Email: 
lfi1@columbia.edu
Phone: 
(212) 305-9304
Administrator: 
Lazina Lorick
Phone: 
(212) 305-4930

The pediatric rheumatologists at NewYork-Presbyterian Morgan Stanley Children's Hospital are playing leading roles in clinical trials of new medications and in developing innovative treatment protocols for juvenile arthritis, dermatomyositis and childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus (cSLE). We have also developed regimens to help patients to function better while reducing the long-term side effects of their treatments.

A major component of research at Morgan Stanley Children's Hospital involves identifying the reason why some people develop an autoimmune disease, while others do not. This mainly involves identifying genes that determine susceptibility and how the genes act to determine disease development. The division faculty is participating in an NIH supported large national data base for 20,000 children with rheumatic diseases to help define best available treatment.

  • A multi-center clinical trial to evaluate cholesterol-lowering drugs in the prevention of atherosclerosis in children and teenagers with lupus (NIH)
  • IL-1 inhibition in systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis. A randomized double blind placebo controlled trial Lisa Imundo (Montefiore Medical Center)
  • Finding a better treatment for Systemic arthritis patients with a long acting IL-1 inhibitor.
  • A multi-center FDA sponsored trial to evaluate medication to prevent adverse effects of cyclophosphamide on ovarian fertility.
  • Etanercept for acute Kawasaki disease. Lisa Imundo, MD (Seattle Children’s Research institute 10169SUB)
  • The IBP-ROCK2-IRF-4 axis, a novel target for therapeutic intervention in SLE. J. Isgro, MD (SLE Lupus foundation)
  • New directions for understanding and treating autoimmune disease (NIH)
  • Investigating the role of Intravenous Gammaglobulin in the treatment of Juvenile Dermatomyositis, and the development of a treatment protocol without steroid therapy.