Department of Neurology Columbia University Neurological Institute  
  The Neurological Institute of New York, 710 West 168th Street, New York, NY 10032-3784 || Columbia Doctors Referral Service (800-227-2762)
 
  neurobiology and behavior research  
 
 
 



CENTER FOR NEUROBIOLOGY AND BEHAVIOR



Neural science at Columbia has a long and distinguished history. Columbia was one of the first universities to develop a major research commitment to neural science, and researchers at Columbia are recognized for a variety of fundamental discoveries. These include pioneering studies by K. C. Cole and Howard Curtis on the mechanism of the action potential, the development by William Nastuk of the iontophoretic technique, the characterization by David Nachmansohn and Arthur Karlin of the molecular nature of acetylcholinesterase and the acetylcholine receptor, and the contributions of Harry Grundfest to comparative neurobiology. While still a graduate student at Columbia, David E. Goldman derived the constant field equation as part of his Ph.D. dissertation.

A new philosophy emerged within the neural science community in the early 1970s that emphasized the need for an integrated approach to solve important functions in brain science. In response to this need, in 1975 Columbia established the Center for Neurobiology and Behavior. The purpose in forming the Center was to bring together in neighboring laboratories a group of investigators experienced in the major disciplines of neural science, with the goal of furthering the understanding of neurobiology at the cellular and molecular level. At present, 43 faculty members, 91 post-doctoral fellows, and 46 graduate students are at work in 43 laboratories. In their research, members of the Center apply the latest techniques of molecular, cellular, and behavioral analysis to a variety of experimental preparations. The congenial research setting actively fosters collaboration between investigators who have different areas of expertise. The faculty of the Center have appointments in the departments of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Biochemistry and Molecular Biophysics, Genetics and Development, Neurology, Pathology, Pharmacology, Physiology and Cellular Biophysics, and Psychiatry.

Research Mission



The research mission of the Center is to arrive at cellular and molecular explanations of development, behavior, and learning that are both intellectually satisfying and relevant to problems of human behavior. Those working in the laboratories of the Center study development, motor control, learning, and motivation at various levels from single channel proteins to behavior. Experimental studies are carried out on a variety of subjects including Drosophila, Aplysia, chicks, guinea pigs, mice, quail, rats, cats, non-human primates and humans. The interactive, interdisciplinary atmosphere of the Center ensures that a wide choice of experimental techniques can be brought to bear on each research problem.
 

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Last updated: February 18, 2014
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