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Faculty Research Profiles:
Scott M. Hammer
Karen Brudney
Mary Ann Chiasson
Jay Dobkin

David A. Fidock
E. Yoko Furuya
Jessica Justman
Franklin Lowy
Ellen Morrison

Julie Myers
Brian Scully
Magdalena Sobieszczyk
Simon Tsiouris

Anne-Catrin Uhlemann
Michael Yin

Clinical Research Programs:
Domestic
International
NAME: Scott M. Hammer, MD

ACADEMIC TITLE:
Chief, Division of Infectious Diseases
Harold C. Neu Professor of Medicine
Professor of Epidemiology

EDUCATION:
Columbia College, BA, 1968
Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, MD, 1972

SPECIALTY: HIV pathogenesis, therapy, and vaccine development

RESEARCH SUMMARY:
Dr Scott Hammer is the Harold C. Neu Professor of Medicine, professor of epidemiology, and chief of the Division of Infectious Diseases at the Columbia University Medical Center. He is also the program director for the Infectious Disease Fellowship at Columbia University Medical Center. His career has been devoted to improving the treatment of HIV infection. He has been an active investigator in the Adult AIDS Clinical Trials Group (AACTG) sponsored by the National Institute of Health (NIH). In the 1990s, he chaired the two largest antiretroviral trials of the AACTG, ACTG 175 and ACTG 320, which helped advance combination therapy as the standard of care worldwide. Dr Hammer is also an investigator in the NIH-sponsored HIV Vaccine Trials Network (HVTN), a multicenter organization whose mission is to develop an effective preventive HIV vaccine. He is the Protocol Chair for the Partnership for AIDS Vaccine Evaluation (PAVE) 100, a phase IIb clinical trial to evaluate the efficacy, safety, and immunogenicity of a multiclade HIV-1 DNA plasmid vaccine followed by a multiclade recombinant adenoviral vector vaccine in HIV-uninfected persons.  He currently is a member of the executive committee of the AACTG and is chair of the phase I/II committee of the HVTN. He has served as an adviser to the Swiss HIV Cohort Study, the French Agence Nationale de Recherches sur le SIDA (ANRS), and the HIV Netherlands–Australia–Thailand (NAT) Research Collaborative. He is vice chair of the IAS–USA Antiretroviral Guidelines Panel and editor in chief of the World Health Organization's (WHO) Antiretroviral Guidelines for Resource Limited Settings. He also serves as a member of the governing council of the International AIDS Society.

SELECTED PUBLICATIONS:

Hammer SM, Katzenstein DA, Hughes MD, Gundacker H, Schooley RT, Haubrich RH, Henry WK, Lederman MM, Phair JP, Niu M, Hirsch MS, Merigan TC (for the ACTG 175 study team). A trial of nucleoside monotherapy vs. combination therapy in HIV-infected adults with CD4 cell counts between 200 and 500 per cubic millimeter: NIAID-sponsored AIDS clinical trials group study 175. N Engl J Med. 1996;335:1081-1096.

Hammer SM, Squires KE, Hughes MD, Grimes JM, Demeter LM, Currier JS, Eron JJ, Feinberg JE, Balfour HH, Deyton LR, Chodakewitz JA, Fischl MA (for the AIDS clinical trials group 320 study team). A controlled trial of two nucleoside analogues plus indinavir in persons with human immunodeficiency virus infection and CD4 cell counts of 200 per cubic millimeter or less. N Engl J Med. 1997;337:725-733.

Hogan CM, Hammer SM. Host determinants in HIV infection and disease. Part 1: Cellular and humoral immune responses. Ann Intern Med. 2001;134:761-776.

Hogan CM, Hammer SM. Host determinants in HIV infection and disease. Part 2: Genetic factors and implications for antiretroviral therapeutics. Ann Intern Med. 2001;134:978-996.

Hammer SM. Increasing choices for HIV therapy. N Engl J Med. 2002;346:2022-2023.

Hammer SM, Vaida F, Bennett KK, Holohan MK, Sheiner L, Eron JJ, Wheat LJ, Mitsuyasu RT, Gulick RM, Valentine FT, Aberg JA, Rogers MD, Karol CN, Saah AJ, Lewis RH, Bessen LJ, Brosgart C, DeGruttola V, and Mellors JW (for the AIDS clinical trials group 398 study team). Dual vs. single protease inhibitor therapy following antiretroviral treatment failure: A randomized trial. J Am Med Assoc. 2002;288:169-180.

Hammer SM, Bassett R, Squires KE, Fischl M, Demeter LM, Currier JS, Mellors JW, Morse GD, Eron JJ, Santana JL, and DeGruttola V. A randomized trial of nelfinavir and abacavir in combination with efavirenz and adefovir dipivoxil in HIV-1-infected persons with virological failure receiving indinavir. Antivir Ther. 2003;8:507-518.

Hammer SM. Clinical practice. Management of newly diagnosed HIV infection. N Engl J Med. 2005;353:1702-1710.


Sobieszczyk ME, Jones J, Wilkin T, Hammer SM. Advances in antiretroviral therapy. Top HIV Med. 2006;14:36-62.  

Hammer SM, Saag MS, Schechter M, Montaner JS, Schooley RT, Jacobsen DM,Thompson MA, Carpenter CC, Fischl MA, Gazzard BG, Gatell JM, Hirsch MS,Katzenstein DA, Richman DD, Vella S, Yeni PG, Volberding PA; International AIDSSociety-USA panel. Treatment for adult HIV infection: 2006 recommendations of the International AIDS Society-USA panel. JAMA. 2006;296:827-43.

 Gripshover BM, Ribaudo H, Santana J, Gerber JG, Campbell TB, Hogg E, JarockiB, Hammer SM, Kuritzkes DR; A5118 Team. Amdoxovir versus placebo with enfuvirtide plus optimized background therapy for HIV-1-infected subjects failing current therapy (AACTG A5118). Antivir Ther. 2006;11:619-23.

 Hammer SM, Saag MS, Schechter M, Montaner JS, Schooley RT, Jacobsen DM,Thompson MA, Carpenter CC, Fischl MA, Gazzard BG, Gatell JM, Hirsch MS,Katzenstein DA, Richman DD, Vella S, Yeni PG, Volberding PA; International AIDSSociety--USA Panel. Treatment for adult HIV infection: 2006 recommendations of the International AIDS Society--USA panel. Top HIV Med. 2006;14:827-43.  

Hammer SM. Nucleoside analogue reverse transcriptase inhibitor options: a re-examination of the class. Top HIV Med. 2006;14:140-3.



OFFICE INFORMATION:
Department of Medicine
Division of Infectious Diseases
630 West 168th Street, Box 82
New York, NY 10032
Tel: (212) 305-7185
Fax: (212) 305-7290
E-mail: smh48@columbia.edu                                                                   back to top


NAME: Karen Brudney, MD

ACADEMIC TITLE:
Assistant Clinical Professor of Medicine

EDUCATION:
Yale University, BA, 1973
Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, MD, 1980

SPECIALTY: HIV pathogenesis, therapy, and vaccine development

RESEARCH SUMMARY:
Dr Brudney is the director of the Infectious Disease/AIDS Clinic and the director of TB service at NewYork–Presbyterian Hospital. She is also the program director for the Treatment Adherence Demonstration Project. In order to improve antiretroviral adherence in difficult populations, an interdisciplinary program called Jumpstart was initiated in 1998 in the Infectious Disease/AIDS Clinic at NewYork–Presbyterian Hospital. Results from this successful program are currently being analyzed. Dr Brudney is also the recipient of a Fogarty Award for AIDS International Training and Research to deliver HIV treatment and study the epidemiology of sexually transmitted diseases in Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic.

SELECTED PUBLICATIONS:
Brudney K, Dobkin JF. Resurgent tuberculosis in New York City: HIV homelessness and the decline of TB control programs. Am Rev Respir Dis. 1991;144:745-749.

Brudney K, Dobkin JF. A tale of two cities: TB control in Nicaragua and New York. Sem Resp Inf. 1991;6:261-272.

Brudney K. Homelessness and tuberculosis: A study in failure. J Law Med Eth. 1993;23:360-367.

Frieden TR et al. A multi-institutional outbreak of highly drug-resistant tuberculosis: Epidemiology and clinical outcomes. JAMA. 1996;276:1229-1235.

Sackoff J et al. Purified protein derivative testing and tuberculosis preventive therapy for HIV-infected patients in NYC. AIDS. 1998;12:2017-2023.

Ellerbock TV et al. Incidence of cervical squamous intraepithelial lesions in HIV-infected women. JAMA. 2000;283:1031-1037.

Wilkin TJ, Palmer S, Brudney KF, Chiasson MA, Wright TC. Anal intraepithelial neoplasia in heterosexual and homosexual HIV-positive men with access to anti-retroviral therapy. J Infect Dis. 2004;190:1685-1691.

Yin M, Dobkin JF, Brudney KF, Becker C, Zadel JL, Manandhar M, Addesso-Dodd V, Shane E. Bone mass and mineral metabolism in HIV-infected postmenopausal women. Osteoporos Int. 2005;16:1345-1352.

OFFICE INFORMATION:
Harkness Pavilion, 6th Floor
180 Fort Washington Avenue
New York, NY 10032
Tel: 212-305-7068
Fax: 212-305-7692
E-mail: Kfb2@columbia.edu                                                                       back to top
NAME: Mary Ann Chiasson, MS, MPH, DrPH

ACADEMIC TITLE:
Associate Professor of Clinical Epidemiology (in Medicine)

EDUCATION:
Bennington College, BA, 1972
New York University, MS, 1978
Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health, MPH, 1985
Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health, DrPH, 1988

SPECIALTY: Epidemiology of HIV, HPV, and other STIs; reproductive health

RESEARCH SUMMARY:
Dr Mary Ann Chiasson is an epidemiologist with a part-time faculty appointment in the Division of Infectious Diseases. Her primary appointment is in the Epidemiology Division at Columbia's Mailman School of Public Health where she directed the Epidemiology of HIV/AIDS course from 1989 through 2003. Dr Chiasson has been the vice president for research and evaluation at the Medical and Health Research Association of New York City (MHRA) since 1999. Before joining MHRA, she served for nine years as an assistant commissioner of health at the New York City Department of Health with scientific and administrative responsibility for AIDS surveillance, AIDS research and vital statistics, and epidemiology. Dr Chiasson's research interests include the epidemiology of HIV (particularly risk factors for sexual transmission and gynecologic manifestations of HIV), women's reproductive health, and infant mortality. Her current research focuses on the role of the Internet in increasing high risk sexual behavior among men who have sex with men. The online HIV prevention video produced by the research collaboration she leads can be viewed at www.hivbigdeal.org.

SELECTED PUBLICATIONS:

Sun X-W, Kuhn L, Ellerbrock TV, Chiasson MA, Bush TJ, Wright TC. Human papillomavirus infection in women infected with the human immunodeficiency virus. N Engl J Med. 1997;337:1343-1349.

Chiasson MA, Berenson L, Li W, Schwartz S, Singh T, Forlenza S, Mojica BA Hamburg MA. Declining HIV/AIDS mortality in New York City. JAIDS.1999;21:59-64.

Ellerbrock TV, Chiasson MA, Bush TJ, Sun X-W, Sawo D, Brudney K, Wright TC. Incidence of cervical squamous intraepithelial lesions in HIV-infected women. JAMA. 2000;283:1031-1037.

Chiasson MA, Parsons JT, Tesoriero JM, Carballo-Dieguez A, Hirshfield S, Remien RH. HIV behavioral research online. J Urban Health 2006; 83:73-85.


Aidala AA, Lee G, Garbers S, Chiasson MA. Sexual behavior and sexual risk in a prospective cohort of HIV-positive men and women in New York City, 1994-2002: Implications for prevention. AIDS Educ Prev 2006; 18:12-32.


Chiasson MA, Hirshfield S, Remien RH, Humberstone M, Wong T, Wolitski RJ. A comparison
of online and offline sexual risk in men who have sex with men: An event-based online survey 2006. JAIDS in press.


OFFICE INFORMATION:

Medical and Health Research Association
220 Church Street, 5th floor
New York, NY 10013
Tel: 646-619-6411
Fax: 646-619-6777                                                                                  
back to top

NAME: Jay Dobkin, MD

ACADEMIC TITLE:
Arnold P. Gold Foundation Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine

EDUCATION:
Columbia College, BA, 1968
Dartmouth Medical School, BMS, 1970
Harvard Medical School, MD, 1972

SPECIALTY: Antiretroviral therapy, harm reduction

RESEARCH SUMMARY:
Dr Jay Dobkin is the Arnold P. Gold Foundation Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine. Dr Dobkin is the director of the AIDS program at Columbia University Medical Center. He is the principal investigator of an ongoing series of quantitative assessments of interventions to promote improved adherence to antiretroviral therapy. Dr Dobkin is also developing assessment strategies for antiretroviral treatment programs targeting injection drug users in the former Soviet Union in collaboration with several nongovernmental organizations active in these areas including the Open Society Institute (New York) and the Open Health Institute (Moscow). He serves as a consultant to the World Health Organization on care and treatment of HIV-infected injection drug users. He is involved in research examining the pathogenesis of HIV-associated bone loss in a longitudinal cohort of postmenopausal women. Dr Dobkin is also the principal investigator of several industry-sponsored studies of new antiretroviral agents.

SELECTED PUBLICATIONS:
Cohn D, Dobkin JF. Treatment and prevention of tuberculosis in HIV infection. AIDS. 1993;7(suppl 1):S195-S202.

Brunswick A et al. HIV-1 seroprevalence and risk behaviors in an urban African American community cohort. Am J Public Health. 1993;83:1390-1394.

Gormam JM et al. Development and characteristics of a medical staging system for HIV infection. Int J Methods Psychiatr Res. 1993;2:117-124.

Thomas C, Dobkin JF, Weinberger O. TAT-medicated transcellular activation of HIV-1 long terminal repeat directed gene expression by HIV-1 infected peripheral blood mononuclear cells. J Immunology. 1994;153:3831-3839.

Lutfey M et al. Independent origin of mono-rifampin-resistant mycobacterium tuberculosis in patients with AIDS. Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 1996;153:837-840.

Simpson D et al. Peptide T in the treatment of painful distal neuropathy associated with AIDS: Results of a placebo-controlled trial. Neurology. 1996;44:1254-1259.

Bangsberg D et al. Reduction in tuberculin skin-test conversions among medical house staff associated with improved tuberculosis infection control practices. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol. 1998;18:566-570.

Yin M, Dobkin JF, Brudney KF, Becker C, Zadel JL, Manandhar M, Addesso-Dodd V, Shane E. Bone mass and mineral metabolism in HIV-infected postmenopausal women. Osteoporos Int. 2005;16:1345-1352.

Dobkin J. Preventing pneumococcal disease. AIDS Reader. 2006. 16(2):81-2
AIDS Read. 2006 Feb;16(2):81-2.


OFFICE INFORMATION:
Harkness Pavilion, 6th Floor
180 Fort Washington Avenue
New York, NY 10032
Tel: 212-305-8507
Fax: 212-305-7692
E-mail: Jfd2@columbia.edu                                                                       back to top

   NAME:  David A. Fidock, PhD

   ACADEMIC TITLE:

   Associate Professor of Microbiology and Medicine

   EDUCATION:
   Adelaide University, South Australia B.Sc., 1986

   University Paris VII, France, Ph.D., 1994


   SPECIALTY:
   Malaria drug resistance, chemotherapy, pathogenesis, cell development

  

   RESEARCH SUMMARY:

   A major focus of our group is to elucidate the molecular basis of chloroquine 

   resistance (CQR). By genetic linkage and positional cloning, we earlier identified  

   the pfcrt gene, located within a chromosomal segment tightly linked to CQR,     

   which encodes a novel 10-transmembrane transporter located on the intra-     

   erythrocytic parasite’s digestive vacuole. Using allelic exchange techniques, we 

   recently proved that mutations in this gene, identified in drug resistant parasites    

   from around the globe, are sufficient to confer CQR to CQ-sensitive parasites.      

   Current work focuses on understanding the contribution of the individual 

   mutations  to CQR, determining their impact on parasite resistance to other  

   antimalarials, and investigating the biochemical basis of CQR. We are also             

   developing animal models to explore the role of pre-existing immunity on host 

   clearance of drug-resistant infections. In collaboration with Dr. Myles Akabas at      

   AECOM, we are also investigating the natural transport properties of pfcrt in

   heterologous cells. Other studies focus on defining the role of PfATPase6, pfmdr1

   and pfnhe in contributing to parasite susceptibility to artemisinin, quinine and 

   mefloquine.

 

   We are also deeply involved in a major public/private partnership, funded by the

   Medicines for Malaria Venture and the NIH, and including GlaxoSmithKline and

   several academic partners, that aims to develop new antimalarial drugs that target

   fatty acid biosynthesis in the malaria parasite.

 

   Another aspect of our research is to investigate the molecular basis of how 

   parasitized erythrocytes bind to host endothelium, enabling them to avoid splenic  

   clearance. A variant antigen family, PfEMP1, mediates this binding. We are

   investigating mechanisms of gene regulation that contribute to this switching of

   gene expression between different members of this family and exploring the

   genetic basis of endothelial receptor specificity.

 

   The fourth area of research focuses on the digestive vacuole, the site of CQ action.

   Specifically, we are examining which ER or Golgi proteins are involved in protein

   trafficking to this compartment and using transfection and bio-informatic

   approaches to define sequence motifs that direct proteins to this site.  

  

   SELECTED PUBLICATIONS:

   Sidhu AB, Sun Q, Nkrumah LJ, Dunne MW, Sacchettini JC & Fidock DA (2007). In

   vitro efficacy, resistance selection, and structural modeling studies implicate the  

   malarial parasite apicoplast as the target of azithromycin. J. Biol. Chem. 282: 2494-

   504.  

 

    Nkrumah LN, Muhle RA, Moura PA, Ghosh P, Hatfull G, Jacobs Jr. WR & Fidock DA

    (2006). Efficient site-specific integration in Plasmodium falciparum chromosomes 

    mediated by mycobacteriophage Bxb1 integrase. Nature Methods 3: 615-21.

 

    Lakshmanan V, Bray PG, Verdier-Pinard D, Johnson DJ, Horrocks P, Muhle RA,

    Alakpa GE, Hughes RH, Ward SA, Krogstad DJ, Sidhu ABS & Fidock DA (2005). A   

    critical role for PfCRT K76T in Plasmodium falciparum verapamil-reversible 

    chloroquine resistance. EMBO J. 24: 2294-305.

    Johnson DJ, Fidock DA, Mungthin M, Lakshmanan V, Sidhu ABS, Bray PG, & Ward

    SA* (2004) Evidence for a central role for PfCRT in conferring Plasmodium

    falciparum resistance to diverse antimalarial agents. Mol. Cell 15: 867-77. *Co-

    corresponding authors.

     Fidock DA, Rosenthal PJ, Croft SL, Brun R & Nwaka S (2004). Antimalarial drug

     discovery: efficacy models for compound screening. Nature Rev. Drug Disc. 3: 509-

     20.

     Sidhu ABS, Verdier-Pinard D & Fidock DA (2002). pfcrt mutations confer

     chloroquine resistance to Plasmodium falciparum malaria parasites.

     Science 298:    210-3

 

     Djimdé A, Doumbo OK, Cortese JF, Kayentao K, Doumbo S, Diourté Y, Coulibaly    

     D, Dicko A, Su X-z, Nomura T, Fidock DA, Wellems TE, and Plowe CV (2001). A

     molecular marker for chloroquine resistant falciparum malaria. New Engl. J. Med.

     344:257-63.

 

    Fidock DA, Nomura T, Talley AK, Cooper RA, Dzekunov SM, Ferdig MT, Ursos LM,  

    Sidhu ABS, Deitsch K, Su X-z, Wootton JC, Roepe PD & Wellems TE (2000).

    Mutations in the P. falciparum digestive vacuole transmembrane protein PfCRT and

    evidence for their role in chloroquine resistance. Mol. Cell 6:681-71.

    LABORATORY HOMEPAGE:

    http://microbiology.columbia.edu/fidock   

    OFFICE INFORMATION:
    Department of Medicine and Microbiology
    Hammer Health Sciences Center Room 1502
    701 West 168th Street
    New York, NY 10032
    Tel: (212) 305-0816
    Fax: (212) 305-4038

    Email: df2260@columbia.edu                                                                   back to top

________________________________________________________________

NAME: E. Yoko Furuya, MD, MS

ACADEMIC TITLE:
Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine


EDUCATION:
Harvard University, BA, 1995
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, MD, 1999

Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health, MS (Epidemiology), 2006


SPECIALTY: Clinical research in hospital epidemiology, antimicrobial resistance, and community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus

RESEARCH SUMMARY:
Dr E. Yoko Furuya is the assistant director of hospital epidemiology for NewYork–Presbyterian Hospital, Columbia University Medical Center. Her research interests are focused in the areas of hospital epidemiology and antimicrobial resistance. She is a coinvestigator with Dr Franklin Lowy on a CDC-funded study investigating the prevalence of and risk factors for community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in northern Manhattan. Other current projects include the evaluation of hospital-specific empiric antibiotic guidelines on antibiotic utilization and resistance and the creation of a computer assisted hospital infection control surveillance system, which is a joint project with Infectious Diseases, Epidemiology, and Biomedical Informatics.

SELECTED PUBLICATIONS:

Furuya EY, Lowy FD: Antimicrobial strategies for the prevention and treatment of cardiovascular infections including cardiothoracic surgery and device implants. Curr Opin Pharmacol 3: 464-9, 2003.

Sobieszczyk ME, Furuya EY, Hay CM, Pancholi P, Della-Latta P, Hammer SM, Kubin CJ: Combination therapy with polymyxin B for the treatment of multidrug-resistant Gram-negative respiratory tract infections. J Antimicrob Chemotherapy 54: 566-9, 2004.

Podwall D, Gupta R, Furuya EY, Sevigny J, Resor SR: Angiostrongylus cantonensis meningitis presenting with facial nerve palsy. J Neurol 10:1280-1, 2004.

Furuya EY, Lowy FD: Antimicrobial-resistant bacteria in the community setting. Nature Rev Microbiol 4: 36-45, 2006.

Cook H, Furuya EY, Larson E, Vasquez G, Lowy FD: Heterosexual transmission of community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Clin Infect Dis 44: 410-3, 2007.

Furuya EY, Cook HA, Lee M, Miller M, Larson E, Hyman S, Della-Latta P, Mendonca E, Lowy FD: Community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus prevalence: how common is it? A methodological comparison of prevalence ascertainment. Am J Infect Control [in press]


OFFICE INFORMATION:
Department of Medicine
Division of Infectious Diseases
630 West 168th Street, Box 82
New York, NY 10032
Tel: 212-305-7185
Fax: 212-305-7290
E-mail: eyf2002@columbia.edu

NAME: Christine Hogan, MD

ACADEMIC TITLE:
Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine

EDUCATION:
Harvard University, BA, 1990
University of California, San Francisco, MD, 1995

SPECIALTY: Acute and recent HIV-1 infection

RESEARCH SUMMARY:
Christine Hogan is an assistant professor in the Division of Infectious Diseases at Columbia University Medical Center. She is a subinvestigator in the AACTG, contributing to clinical trials of HIV therapeutics. She also leads CUMC's Acute HIV Infection program, the purpose of which is to identify persons with acute or recent HIV-1 infection, engage them in comprehensive HIV care, and invite them to participate in clinical trials. The clinical trials are part of the NIH-funded Acute Infection and Early Disease Research Program (AIEDRP), a multisite pathogenesis and clinical trials network in which Columbia participates. Dr Hogan is the national protocol chair of a multisite protocol of treatment during early HIV-1 infection which is being performed within the AACTG as well as AIEDRP. Dr Hogan follows a panel of patients longitudinally in the department's HIV clinic and precepts ID fellows during their outpatient clinic experience. She is the course director for Microbiology/Infectious Diseases, the second-year medical student course in infectious diseases at Columbia University.

SELECTED PUBLICATIONS:
Hogan C, Hammer S. Host determinants in HIV infection and disease Part 1: Cellular and humoral immune responses. Ann Intern Med. 2001;134:761-776.

Hogan C, Hammer S. Host determinants in HIV infection and disease Part 2: Genetic factors and implications for antiretroviral therapeutics. Ann Intern Med. 2001;134:978-996.

Louie M, Hogan C, Di Mascio M, Hurley A, Simon V, Rooney J, Ruiz N, Brun S, Sun E, Perelson A, Ho D, Markowitz M. Determining the relative efficacy of highly active antiretroviral therapy. J Infect Dis. 2003;187:896-900.

Louie M, Hogan C, Hurley A, Simon V, Chung C, Padte N, Lamy P, Flaherty J, Coakley D, Di Mascio M, Perelson A, Markowitz M. Determining the antiviral activity of tenofovir disoproxil fumarate in treatment-naïve chronically HIV-1-infected individuals. AIDS. 2003;17:1151-1156.

Mehandru S, Poles MA, Tenner-Racz K, Horowitz A, Hurley A, Hogan C, Boden D, Racz P, Markowitz M. Primary HIV-1 infection is associated with preferential depletion of CD4+ T lymphocytes from effector sites in the gastrointestinal tract. J Exp Med. 2004;200:761-770.

Mehandru S, Wrin T, Galovich J, Stiegler G, Vcelar B, Hurley A, Hogan C, Vasan S, Katinger H, Petropoulos CJ, Markowitz M. Neutralization profiles of newly transmitted human immunodeficiency virus type 1 by monoclonal antibodies 2G12, 2F5, and 4E10. J Virol. 2004;78:14039-14042.

OFFICE INFORMATION:
Department of Medicine
Division of Infectious Diseases
630 West 168th Street, Box 82
New York, NY 10032
Tel: 212-305-7185
Fax: 212-305-7290
E-mail: ch358@columbia.edu                                                                    back to top
NAME: Jessica Justman, MD

ACADEMIC TITLE:
Assistant Professor of Clinical Epidemiology and Medicine

EDUCATION:
Yale University, BS, 1981
University of Rochester, MD, 1985

SPECIALTY: HIV primary care, antiretroviral therapy, metabolic complications

RESEARCH SUMMARY:
Dr Justman is the associate director of the Center for Infectious Disease Epidemiologic Research (CIDER). In addition, within the International Center for AIDS Care and Treatment Programs (ICAP), she is director of the University Technical Assistance program. Both CIDER and ICAP are part of the Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University. Dr Justman's research interests are in the areas of microbicides and the metabolic complications of antiretroviral agents. Within the NIAID-funded HIV Prevention Trials Network (HPTN), she served as the principal investigator of the Bronx–Lebanon HPTN site, and conducted two phase I safety of vaginal microbicides in both HIV-infected and uninfected women and couples. Dr Justman is a cochair of HPTN 059, a phase II extended safety microbicide study which will enroll 200 women. She has worked with the NIAID-funded Women's Interagency HIV Study (WIHS) and has several publications on metabolic complications in this cohort. She also serves as vice chair of the New York State AIDS Institute's Medical Care Criteria Committee.

SELECTED PUBLICATIONS:

Justman JE, Benning L, Danoff A, Minkoff H, Levine A, Greenblatt RM, Weber K, Piessens E, Eobinson E, Anastos K. Protease inhibitor use and the incidence of diabetes mellitus in a large cohort of HIV-infected women. J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr. 2003;32:298-302.

Tien PC, Cole SR, Williams CM, Li R, Justman JE, Cohen MH, Young M, Rubin N, Augenbraun M, Grunfeld C. Incidence of lipoatrophy and lipohypertrophy in the women's interagency HIV study. J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr. 2003;5:461-466.

Mulligan K, Anasos K, Justman J, Freeman R, Wichienkuer P, Robison E, Hessol NA. Fat distribution in HIV-infected women in the United States: DEXA substudy in the women's interagency HIV study. J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr. 2005;38:18-22.

Danoff A, Shi Q, Justman J, Mulligan K, Hessol N, Robison E, Lu D, Williams T, Wichienkuer P, Anaasotos K. Oral glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity are unaffected by HIV infection or antiretroviral therapy in overweight women. Acquir Immune Defic Syndr. 2005;39:55-62.

Tien PC, Schneider MF, Cole SR, Justman JE, French AL, Young M, DeHovitz J, Nathwani N, Brown TT. Relation of stavudine discontinuation to anthropometric changes among HIV-infected women. J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr. 2007. 44(1):43-8.

 

Watts DH, Springer G, Minkoff H, Hillier SL, Jacobson L, Moxley M, Justman J, Cejtin H, O’Connell C, Greenblatt RM. The occurrence of vaginal infections among HIV-infected and high-risk HIV-uninfected women: longitudinal findings of the women's interagency HIV study. J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr. 2006. 43(2):161-8.

 

El-Sadr WM, Mayer KH, Maslankowski L, Hoesley C, Justman J, Gai F, Mauck C, Absalon J, Morrow K, Masse B, Soto-Torres L, Kwiecien A. Safety and acceptability of cellulose sulfate as a vaginal microbicide in HIV-infected women. AIDS. 2006. 20(8):1109-16.

 

Mayer KH, Maslankowski LA, Gai F, El-Sadr WM, Justman J, Kwiecien A, Masse B, Eshleman SH, Hendrix C, Morrow K, Rooney JF, Soto-Torres L; HPTN 050 Protocol Team. Safety and tolerability of tenofovir vaginal gel in abstinent and sexually active HIV-infected and uninfected women. AIDS. 2006. 20(4):543-51.



OFFICE INFORMATION:
722 W 168th Street, Room 714
Columbia University Medical Center
New York, New York 10032
Tel: 212-342-0537
E-mail: jj2158@columbia.edu                                                                    back to top

NAME: Franklin Lowy, MD

ACADEMIC TITLE:
Professor of Medicine and Pathology

EDUCATION:
Columbia College BA, 1968
Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, MD, 1972

SPECIALTY:

Transmission of Staphylococcus aureus in high-risk populations

Pathogenesis of Staphylococcus aureus and epidermidis infections


RESEARCH SUMMARY:
Dr Franklin Lowy is a professor of medicine and pathology in the Division of Infectious Diseases in the College of Physicians and Surgeons at Columbia University. Dr Lowy's laboratory currently investigates the pathogenesis and epidemiology of Staphylococcus aureus infections. As a part of these studies, his group is currently conducting two community-based studies on the transmission of S. aureus. The first, a NIDA-sponsored study in Bedford–Stuyvesant, Brooklyn, is an investigation of the transmission of S. aureus among injecting and inhalational drug users. The study combines the use of molecular epidemiologic techniques with social-network methodology. The second study, a CDC-sponsored investigation, is an investigation of the prevalence and spread of a new strain of S. aureus in northern Manhattan.

Another area of research involves investigating the pathogenesis of staphylococcal infections in patients with left ventricular assist devices (LVADs). In an NHLBI-supported study, the laboratory is investigating the role of different S. aureus and S. epidermidis surface proteins as mediators of adherence to explanted LVAD material. The goal is to identify potential vaccine candidates. A multi-center observational trial is also a part of this project. The goal is to better understand the epidemiology of LVAD-related infections.


SELECTED PUBLICATIONS:
Lowy FD. Staphylococcus aureus Infections. N Engl J Med. 1998;339:520-532.

Lowy FD. Antimicrobial resistance: The example of Staphylococcus aureus. J Clin Invest. 2003;111:1265-1273.

Cespedes C et al. The clonality of Staphylococcus aureus nasal carriage. J Infect Dis. 2005;191:444-452.

Gordon RJ et al. A molecular epidemiological analysis of 2 Staphylococcus aureus conal types colonizing and infecting patients with AIDS. Clin Infect Dis. 2005;40:1028-1036.

Gordon RJ, Lowy FD. Bacterial infections in drug users. N Engl J Med. 2005;353:1945-1954.

Furuya EY, Lowy FD. Antimicrobial-resistant bacteria in the community setting. Nature Microbiol Rev. 2006;4:36-45.

Arrecubieta C, Asai T, Bayern M, Loughman A., Fitzgerald J Ross, Shelton CE, Baron HM, Dang NC, Deng M, Naka Y, Foster TJ, and Lowy FD. The role of S. aureus adhesions in the pathogenesis of ventricular assist device related infections. J Infect Dis. 2006;193:1109-1119.

Aiello AE, Lowy FD, Wright LN, Larson EL. Meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus among US prisoners and military personnel: review and recommendations for future studies. Lancet Infect Dis. 2006;6:335-41.

Gordon RJ, Quagliarello B, Lowy FD. Ventricular assist device-related infections. Lancet Infect Dis. 2006;6:426-37.

Aboelela SW, Saiman L, Stone P, Lowy FD, Quiros D, Larson E. Effectiveness of barrier precautions and surveillance cultures to control transmission of multidrug-resistant organisms: a systematic review of the literature. Am J Infect Control. 2006;34:484-94.

Cook HA, Furuya EY, Larson E, Vasquez G, Lowy FD. Heterosexual transmission of community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Clin Infect Dis. 2007;44:410-3.

OFFICE INFORMATION:
Department of Medicine
Division of Infectious Diseases
630 West 168th Street, 9-458
New York, NY 10032
Tel: 212-305-5787
Fax: 212-305-5794
E-mail: fl189@columbia.edu                                                                      back to top

NAME: Ellen Morrison, MD, MPH

ACADEMIC TITLE:
Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine and Clinical Epidemiology

EDUCATION:
Olivet Nazarene College, BA, 1979
Washington University School of Medicine, MD, 1984
Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health, MPH, 1996

SPECIALTY: General infectious diseases, HIV/AIDS, sexually transmitted diseases, infections in pregnancy

RESEARCH SUMMARY:
Dr Morrison is an assistant professor of clinical medicine in the Division of Infectious Diseases. She is the program director for the Nicholas A. Rango HIV Scholar's program at NewYork–Presbyterian Hospital. Dr Morrison is also the medical director of the HIV Counseling and Testing Service at NewYork–Presbyterian Hospital.

SELECTED PUBLICATIONS:
Morrison EAB et al. Human papillomavirus infection and other risk factors for cervical neoplasia: A case control study. Int J Cancer. 1991;49:6-13.

Morrison EAB et al. Self-administered home cervicovaginal lavage: A novel tool for the clinical/epidemiological investigation of genital HPV Infections. Am J Obstet Gynecol. 1992;167:104-107.

Morrison EAB et al. Quantitation may improve clinical utility. J Clin Micro. 1992;30:2539-2543.

Morrison EAB et al. Pregnancy and cervical infection with human papillomaviruses. Int J Gyn Obstet. 1996;54:125-130.

Morrison EAB et al. Low prevalence of cervical human papillomavirus infection in renal transplant recipients. Neph Dial Trans. 1996:1603-1606.

Morrison EAB et al. Development of a multi-item scale to quantitatively assess sexual behaviors and the transmission of high and low risk human papillomaviruses. Sex Trans Dis. 1998;25:509-515.

OFFICE INFORMATION:
Harkness Pavilion, 6th Floor
180 Fort Washington Avenue
New York, NY 10032
Tel: 212-305-6328
E-mail: eam6@columbia.edu                                                                     back to top

NAME: Brian Scully, MD

ACADEMIC TITLE:
Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine

EDUCATION:
Trinity College, Dublin University, BA, 1969
Trinity College, Dublin University, MB, BCh, BAO, 1971
Trinity College, Dublin University, MA, 1973

SPECIALTY: Nosocomial infections, transplant infectious disease

RESEARCH SUMMARY:
Dr Scully is the chair of the Infection Control Committee at NewYork–Presbyterian Hospital, and cochair of the Joint Infection Control Committee and the Joint Subcommittee on Anti-infective Use. His research interests are in nosocomial infections, transplant infectious disease, and hospital epidemiology.

SELECTED PUBLICATIONS:
Argenziano et al. The influence of infection on survival and successful transplantation in patients with left ventricular assist devices. J Heart Lung Transplant. 1997;16:822-831.

Sinha et al. Infections during left ventricular assist device support do not affect postransplant outcomes. Circulation. 2000;102III:194-199.

Knirsh CA et al. An outbreak of Legionella micdadei pneumonia in transplant patients: Evaluation, molecular epidemiology, and control. Am J Med. 2000;108:290-295.

Saiman L et al. Banning artificial nails from health care settings. Am J Infect Control. 2002;11:252-254.

Lux JZ et al. Transfusion-associated babesiosis after heart transplant. Emerg Infect Dis. 2003;9:116-119.

Haas S, Scully B, Cohen D, Radhakrishnan J. Mycobacterium avium complex infection in kidney transplant patients. Transpl Infect Dis. 2005 7(2):75-9.

 

Farr M, Rubin AI, Mangurian C, Scully B et al. Late syphilis in cardiac transplant patient. J Heart Lung Transplant. 2006 25(3): 358-61.


OFFICE INFORMATION:
Department of Medicine
Division of Infectious Diseases
630 West 168th Street, Box 82
New York, NY 10032
Tel: 212-305-7185
Fax: 212-305-7290                                                                                 back to top

NAME: Magdalena Sobieszczyk, MD

   ACADEMIC TITLE:
   Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine

   EDUCATION:
   Harvard University, BA, 1994
   Columbia College of Physicians and Surgeons, MD, 1998
   Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health, MPH, 2006

   SPECIALTY: HIV vaccine trials, international HIV, metabolic complications of HIV     

   therapy

   RESEARCH SUMMARY:

Dr. Magdalena Sobieszczyk is an Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine in the Infectious Diseases Division at the Columbia University College of Physicians. Her current research experience includes complications of antiretroviral therapy, and HIV vaccines. Under the auspices of the Center for Infectious Disease Epidemiologic Research (CIDER), she is collaborating with Dr. Jessica Justman at the Mailman School of Public Health to study the prevalence of the metabolic syndrome and its association with inflammatory markers among HIV-infected women in The Women’s Interagency HIV Study (WIHS) cohort. She is a co-investigator of the Centre for the AIDS Program of Research in South Africa (CAPRISA) project entitled “Viral Setpoint and Clinical Progression in HIV-1 Subtype C Infection: The Role of Immunological and Viral Factors During Acute and Early Infection” (Salim Abdool Karim, PI). Dr. Sobieszczyk is also a co-PI for a study evaluating the prevalence of insulin resistance among HIV-1 negative and recently infected South African women in the Acute Infection Study cohort. 

She is a co-investigator for the New York HIV Vaccine Trials Unit at Columbia University and the New York Blood Center and is involved in developing and chairing a national and international HIV vaccine protocol. 


SELECTED ABSTRACTS AND PUBLICATIONS:

Sobieszczyk ME, Kubin CJ, Della-Latta P, Scully B. Antimicrobial use and rate of    Vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus infections in neutropenic patients on a        Hematology- Oncology unit. Abstract presented at the 41st Annual Meeting of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. October 2003.

Furuya EY, Sobieszczyk ME, Kubin CJ, Hay CM. Intraventricular Polymyxin B for the treatment of multi-drug resistant Gram-negative bacillary ventriculitis: Two successful cases. Abstract presented at the 41st Annual Meeting of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. October 2003.

Sobieszczyk ME, Furuya EY, Kubin CJ, Hay CM. Efficacy and safety of Polymyxin B in the treatment of infections caused by multi-drug resistant Gram-negative organisms. Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. 2004 Aug; 54(2):566-9.

Sobieszczyk ME, Hay CM. “Gender-Specific Issues in Non-HIV Viral Infections” in Principles of Gender Specific Medicine. Edited by Marianne J. Lagato

Academic Press May 2004.

Sobieszczyk ME, Coakley EP, Wilkin TJ, Hammer, SM. Advances in antiretroviral therapy. Highlights of the 11th Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections, February 8-11, 2004.
Topics in HIV Medicine. 2004 Mar-Apr;12(1):9-2

Mariller MM, Abramson D, Sobieszczyk ME. The Validity of Self-Reported Clinical Markers and Medication Regimens: A Pilot Study. CHAIN Report 2004-6. Submitted Nov 17, 2004.

Sobieszczyk ME, Talley AK, Wilkin T, Hammer SM. Advances in antiretroviral therapy. Highlights of the 12th Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections, 2005. Topics in HIV Medicine. 2005 Mar-April; 13(1):22-44.

 Sobieszczyk ME, Jones J, Wilkin T, Hammer SM. Advances in antiretroviral therapy. Highlights  of the 13th Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections, 2006. Topics in HIV M edicine. 2006 April; 14(1):22-44.

Sobieszczyk ME, D.R. Hoover, K. Anastos, K. Mulligan, T. Tan, C. Hyman, M.H. Cohen, S.R. Cole, J. Justman, Women's Interagency HIV Study.  Prevalence and predictors of metabolic syndrome among HIV-positive and negative women. Presented at the XVI International AIDS Conference, 2006 Abstract no. WEPE0147.  Manuscript in progress


OFFICE INFORMATION:
622 W 168th Street, Box 82
Columbia University Medical Center
New York, New York 10032
Tel: 212-305-7185
E-mail: mes52@columbia.edu                                                                 back to top

_________________________________________________________________

NAME: Simon Tsiouris, MD, MPH

ACADEMIC TITLE:
Assistant Professor of Clinical Epidemiology and Clinical Medicine

EDUCATION:
Johns Hopkins University School of Arts and Sciences, BA, 1994
Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, MD, 1998
Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health, MPH, 2004

SPECIALTY: TB and TB/HIV epidemiology, TB diagnostics

RESEARCH SUMMARY:
Dr. Simon Tsiouris is assistant professor of clinical medicine and clinical epidemiology at the Columbia University Medical Center and assistant attending in infectious diseases at the NewYork–Presbyterian Hospital. Dr Tsiouris's research interests include TB and HIV epidemiology, TB diagnostics, and TB/HIV operational research. He has conducted a latent TB infection survey of schoolchildren in a South African township and he has been involved in a similar survey in Peru. His work in South Africa has included the evaluation of the sensitivity of a TB-specific whole blood interferon-gamma release assay. Dr. Tsiouris is co-investigator on a CDC Tuberculosis Epidemiologic Studies Consortium-sponsored multi-site study to evaluate new interferon-gamma release assays in the diagnosis of LTBI in health care workers.  He is also co-investigator on the NIH sponsored East Africa International Epidemiologic Databases to Evaluate AIDS (IeDEA) study.  Dr. Tsiouris collaborates with the International Center for AIDS Care and Treatment Programs (ICAP) at the Mailman School of Public Health on the design and implementation of targeted evaluations and operational research. Studies currently underway or being developed include examining the operating characteristics of TB screening questionnaires to improve case detection in HIV care and treatment programs and evaluating an HIV Nurse Mentor Training program, both in South Africa. 


Publications

 M Gasana, G Vandebriel, G Kabanda, SJ Tsiouris, J Justman, R Sahabo, D Kamugundu, W El-Sadr. Integrating Tuberculosis and HIV care in rural Rwanda. International Journal of Tuberculosis and Lung Disease: Special issue on TB/HIV scale-up: innovative strategies to measure and evaluate our progress. Accepted for publication May 3rd, 2007.

 Gasana M, Vandebriel G, Kabanda G, Mugabo J, Tsiouris SJ, Ayaba A, Finlay A,  Justman J, Sahabo R, El-Sadr W. Tuberculosis in Rwanda: Challenges to reaching the targets.  Bulletin of the World Health Organization: Special theme: Tuberculosis control. 2007; 85(5):383-384.  Y Hirsch-Moverman, S Tsiouris, J Salazar-Schicchi, PW Colson, H Muttana, W El-Sadr. Physician Attitudes Regarding Latent Tuberculosis Infection: International vs. U.S. Medical Graduates. International Journal of Tuberculosis and Lung Disease. 2006;10(10):1178–1180 SJ Tsiouris, D Coetzee, PL Toro, J Austin, Z Stein, W El-Sadr. Sensitivity Analysis and Potential Uses of a Novel Gamma Interferon Release Assay for Diagnosis of Tuberculosis.  Journal of Clinical Microbiology. 2006;44(8):2844-2850. SJ Tsiouris, J Austin, P Toro, D Coetzee, K Weyer, Z Stein, W El-Sadr.  Results of a tuberculosis-specific IFN-γ assay in children at high risk for tuberculosis infection.  International Journal of Tuberculosis and Lung Disease.  2006; 10(8):939-941. M Saito, W Pan, R Gilman, C Bautista, S Bamrah, C Martin, S Tsiouris, DF Arguello, G Martinez-Carrasco. Comparison of altitude effect on Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection between rural and urban communities in Peru.  American Journal of Tropical Medicine & Hygiene. 2006; 75(1): 49–54 Tsiouris S, Lowy FD. “Gender and Bacterial Infections” in Principles and Practices of Gender Specific Medicine. 1st ed., Legato MJ, editor. Academic Press, San Diego 2004. 

Tsiouris SJ, Breschel TS, Xu J, McInnis MG, McMahon FJ. Linkage disequilibrium analysis of G-olf alpha (GNAL) in bipolar affective disorder. American Journal of Medical Genetics. 1996 Sep 20; 67(5):491-4.

Selected  Abstracts

Gasana M, Vandebriel G, Gaspard K, Tsiouris S.  Integrating Tuberculosis and HIV Care in Rwanda, Oral presentation, the President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief Third Annual Field Meeting, 2006, Durban.

Vandebriel G, El-Sadr W, Gasana M, Justman J,  Koscelnik V, Tsiouris S. Increasing collaboration and integration between TB and HIV programs and services in Rwanda. Oral presentation, the President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief Second Annual Field Meeting, 2005, Addis Ababa



OFFICE INFORMATION:
630 West 168th Street, Box 82

New York, NY 10032 Tel: (212) 305-7185Fax: (212) 305-7290

E-mail: st326@columbia.edu                                                                    back to top

NAME: Michael Yin, MD, MS

ACADEMIC TITLE:
Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine

EDUCATION:
Princeton University, BA, 1991
Columbia College of Physicians and Surgeons, MD, 1996
Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health, MS (Epidemiology), 2004

SPECIALTY: HIV therapy and metabolic complications

RESEARCH SUMMARY:

Dr Yin is an assistant professor of clinical medicine in the Division of Infectious Diseases. Dr Yin's primary research interest is in the metabolic complications of HIV infection and antiretroviral therapy. With support from an NIH/NIAID K23 research career award, he is examining the pathogenesis of HIV-associated bone loss in women utilizing novel molecular assays and bone histomorphometry. He is a member of the NIH-sponsored Women’s Health Interagency Study (WIHS) Metabolic Working Group, and is the lead investigator for several bone metabolism related analyses.  He is also a site investigator in the AIDS Clinical Trials Unit and the HIV Vaccine Trials Unit at Columbia University Medical Center.

SELECTED PUBLICATIONS:
Yin M, Despommier D. Gender and parasitic infections. In: Legato,MJ, ed. Principles and Practices of Gender-Specific Medicine. 1st ed. San Diego, CA: Academic Press; 2004.

Yin M, Dobkin JF, Brudney KF, Becker C, Zadel JL, Manandhar M, Addesso-Dodd V, Shane E. Bone mass and mineral metabolism in HIV infected postmenopausal women. Osteoporosis International, 2005; 16(11):1345-52

Yin MT, Glesby M. Recombinant human growth hormone (somatropin) therapy in HIV-associated wasting and visceral adiposity. Expert Review in Anti-Infective Therapy, 2005; 3(5): 727-38

Yin MT, Glesby M. Low Bone Mineral Density, HIV, and Women: Fracture or Fiction? Clinical Infectious Diseases, 2006; 42(7):1021-3.

Yin MT, Shane E. Low bone mineral density in patients with HIV: pathogenesis and clinical significance. Current Opinion in Endocrinology and Diabetes, 2006; 13:497-502

Yin MT, Dobkin J, Grbric J. HIV Infection and Associated Periodontal Manifestations. Periodontology 2000, 2007; 44: 1-27.


OFFICE INFORMATION:
Department of Medicine
Division of Infectious Diseases
630 West 168th Street, Box 82
New York, NY 10032
Tel: 212-305-7185
Fax: 212-305-7290
E-mail: mty4@columbia.edu                                                                    back to top

CLINICAL RESEARCH PROGRAMS: DOMESTIC

HIV Prevention and Treatment Research Program
The goals of the
HIV Prevention and Treatment Research Program (HPTRP) (Scott Hammer, principal investigator, Magdalena Sobieszczyk and Michael Yin, co-investigators) are to set the standards of care for people living with HIV and to help speed the development of an effective vaccine to prevent HIV infection. The program works toward these goals by engaging the community and conducting clinical studies within the Division of Infectious Diseases at the Columbia University Medical Center. The HPTRP participates actively in studies sponsored by three NIH-funded networks: the Adult AIDS Clinical Trials Group (AACTG), and the HIV Vaccine Trials Network (HVTN). The HPTRP also supports pharmaceutical studies. There are opportunities for fellows and residents to participate in all aspects of HIV/AIDS clinical trials.

The AACTG is the largest NIH-sponsored HIV clinical trials organization and plays a major role in defining the standards of care for treatment of HIV infection and opportunistic diseases related to HIV/AIDS around the world. We provide a wide range of treatment studies four areas of focus (1) end organ disease and inflammation, (2) HIV reservoirs and viral eradication  (3) hepatitis, (4) tuberculosis

The HVTN is an NIH-sponsored international network that was designed to facilitate the process of testing preventive vaccines against HIV/AIDS. The New York City HIV Vaccine Trials Unit is a collaboration between the Columbia HPTRP and Project ACHIEVE (AIDS Community Health Initiative En route to a Vaccine Effort) which is part of the New York Blood Center (Beryl Koblin, PhD, principal investigator). The New York City HIV Vaccine Trials Unit supports a large number of HVTN-sponsored preventive vaccine trials, studies investigating combination prevention approaches, as well as a behavioral interventions among high risk individuals. Past and current fellows have conducted HIV prevention research projects with investigators in the Vaccine research unit.


Center for Interdisciplinary Research to Prevent Infections (CIRI)

CIRI aims to prepare biomedical researchers and others in interdisciplinary research with a focus on the prevention and control of antimicrobial resistance. Under the leadership of Elaine Larson, PhD, RN and Lisa Saiman, MD, the center has implemented a core program and curriculum to prepare biomedical researchers to conduct interdisciplinary research. The center also funds several demonstration projects designed to rationalize antimicrobial use and reduce antimicrobial resistance. CIRI offers a tremendous resource for pre- and postdoctoral fellows who are interested in true interdisciplinary research. The framework for CIRAR integrates health and risk communication, economics, informatics, epidemiology, and health services with the basic research and disciplinary expertise of its team members.

Recently, CIRI has awarded funding to three of our trainees conducting research on antimicrobial resistance: Jennifer Horan, Benjamin Miko and Stephanie Pouch.

Hospital Epidemiology and Antimicrobial Utilization, Resistance, and Stewardship

The Division of Infectious Diseases is actively involved in hospital epidemiology and antimicrobial stewardship at NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital. These programs are linked to numerous ongoing clinical research projects focusing on healthcare-associated infections and antimicrobial resistance, as well as outcomes research evaluating the impact of interventions in infection prevention and antimicrobial stewardship. Ongoing research projects include evaluations of specific antimicrobials such as polymyxin B and daptomycin, evaluations of multidrug-resistant gram-negative bacilli including those producing Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase (KPC), and severity criteria and outcomes of patients with Clostridium difficile infections. Past and current fellows have engaged in many of these clinical research projects with mentoring from Drs. Yoko Furuya, Christine Kubin, and Lisa Saiman.

Transplant Infectious Diseases Program

The active transplant infectious diseases service presents many opportunities for collaborative and multidisciplinary research projects. Past and ongoing clinical research projects aim to, for example, develop new tools for diagnosis and treatment of multi-drug resistant infections in immunocompromised adults in the pre and post-transplantation period.

Past and current fellows have engaged in mentored research in the area of transplantation infectious diseases: Jennifer Horan, Stephanie Pouch and Claire Gordon.  

HIV Center for Clinical and Behavioral Studies
Founded in 1987 and continuously supported by a major grant from the National Institute of Mental Health, the HIV Center for Clinical and Behavioral Studies serves as a national and international hub for a network of research activities and community outreach. Research focuses on the intersection of HIV infection, gender, and sexuality; treatment strategies for infected populations; and innovative dissemination of scientific findings. More than one hundred researchers, clinicians, and support staff sustain the work of the center. Affiliated research is conducted through more than two dozen individual studies headed by leading investigators from various disciplines, including psychology, psychiatry, public health, anthropology, sociology, and social work. The center also works with a broad range of HIV-infected and HIV-affected populations and are committed to responding to the needs of underserved populations.

The Division of Infectious Diseases maintains active collaborations with faculty members from the Mailman School of Public Health in the Departments of Epidemiology and Sociomedical Sciences.  


CLINICAL RESEARCH PROGRAMS: INTERNATIONAL

University of KwaZulu-Natal, IACTU, and CAPRISA in South Africa
The division maintains a strong collaborative relationship with the Mandela School of Medicine, University of KwaZulu-Natal in Durban, South Africa. The projects currently in place include the establishment of an International AIDS Clinical Trials Unit (IACTU) (Professor Umesh Lalloo, principal investigator) and the
Centre for the AIDS Program of Research in South Africa, CAPRISA (Professor Salim Abdool Karim, principal investigator). CAPRISA's goal is to develop and undertake research that contributes to the understanding of HIV pathogenesis and epidemiology, as well as to build local research infrastructure and to provide training through research fellowships for young investigators from South Africa and the United States. One of the projects initiated by the CAPRISA research team is an NIH-funded acute infection study evaluating the clinical, immunological, and viral factors during acute and early HIV-1 subtype C infection. A large cohort of HIV-1 negative high risk women has been enrolled into this observational study.
 

The Columbia University International Family AIDS Program (IFAP), La Romana, Dominican Republic

IFAP is a non-profit organization that supports clinical services, and research, education and training. Program activities focus on improving direct care and treatment as well as preventive health education and services for TB and HIV-infected women, children and families and other vulnerable populations in the Dominican Republic.


HIV Treatment Centers in the Dominican Republic

Drs. Karen Brudney and Barbara Taylor have a long-standing relationship with two non-governmental organizations, the Instituto Dermatologico y Cirugia de Piel Dr. Huberto Bogaert Diaz and the Clinica Profamilia Evangelina Rodriguez which provide specialty HIV care and HIV prevention services in Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic. This collaboration supports a longitudinal cohort that examines treatment outcomes and the development of antiretroviral resistance among people living with HIV on antiretroviral therapy.

The International Center for AIDS Care and Treatment Programs (ICAP)
Bringing together diverse initiatives aimed at addressing the HIV/AIDS epidemic, the International Center for AIDS Care and Treatment Programs (ICAP) focuses on service delivery, research, and training/education in resource-limited settings. Faculty and staff provide support in program development, clinical issues, administration, training, monitoring and evaluation, and research endeavors. The program draws upon the broader resources of the Mailman School of Public Health, as well as those of Columbia University, to fulfill its mission. As a center within the school, and as part of the Columbia health sciences campus, ICAP is committed to participating in the life of the academic medical institution and to providing training opportunities for students, house staff, and fellows. ICAP offers postdoctoral trainees access to large databases in order to develop, conduct, and analyze cohort studies while addressing infectious disease epidemiology issues of global importance.

ICAP provides support and assistance to international partners and clinical facilities through these programs and initiatives:

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